Twelve steps to healthier eating

Our relationship with food is an emotional one - and that means that we can't rationalise our way out of some of our decisions about food. Whilst hypnotherapy can help with our emotional relationship with food, there are some practical steps that we can take to give ourselves the best chance of eating healthily.

1. Serve yourself salad, vegetables and protein before you serve yourself carbohydrates.

2. If you serve yourself from the stove or worktop you are likely to eat 19% less than if you serve yourself from the table.

3. The size of serving spoon makes a difference – people with smaller serving spoons serve themselves about 14% less food.

4. The size of your plate ideally should be 22cm, and should be no more than 25cm.

5. Dark plates, that contrast with the light colour of carbohydrates such as potatoes, pasta and rice prompt people to eat about 18% less. The same goes for dark bowls contrasting with porridge.

6. When you eat alone, eat at the table and not in front of the television, and if possible in front of a mirror.

7. Eat with your knife and fork in the “wrong” hand in order to make you eat more slowly and consciously.

8. Alternatively eat using children’s cutlery to make you eat more slowly and consciously.

9. Keep your kitchen worktops clear, and only have fresh fruit within sight – nuts and cereals should be out of site.

10. Keep your vegetables on the middle shelf of your refrigerator, where they’re easily seen.

11. Have at least six servings of protein in your refrigerator.

12. If you class yourself as an “emotional eater” think of treats and rewards that aren’t to do with food – perhaps making time for yourself, time with friends, or a massage or beauty treatment.

Hypnotherapy Directory is not responsible for the articles published by members. The views expressed are those of the member who wrote the article.

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Written by John McKenzie

Cheshire hypnotherapist John McKenzie specialises in treating people with anxiety, and the ways that their anxiety manifests itself - through sleep problems, phobias, pain, and habits. A registered member of the NCH and CHNC he works with private clients and with employers on workplace stress and well-being.… Read more

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